Questionnaires by linguistic subfield

2000

1999

  • "Numerous people have contributed to the initial design and/or subsequent improvements of this questionnaire. These include: Felix Ameka, Michael Dunn, Jiirgen Bohnemeyer, James Essegbey, Raquel Guirardello, Birgit Hellwig, Sotaro Kita, Steve Levinson, Anna Margetts, Asli Ozyurek, Angela Terrill, and Barbara Villanova." (Wilkins​, 1999: 1)

1998

  • "In the nature of our design, and our discussion, we rely heavily on Talmy's (1985) notion of lexicalization patterns, in particular his cross-linguistic discussion of systems of motion description. We are interested, for instance, in patterns of semantic conflation (that is, what other semantic information besides 'motion' may be encoded in a verb root) and patterns of semantic distribution (that is, what types of information are encoded in the different morphemes that come together to build a description of a motion event)." (Wilkins et al., 1998: 1).

  • ''This questionnaire was developed in the early 1990s for the study of concessive conditional clauses (adverbial clauses introduced by 'even if', 'whether...or', or 'wh-ever') in European languages. [...] Some of the results were published in the following paper:

1997

1996

  • ''The authors have made available a database containing the results of their use of the questionnaire. There are several versions of the database available. [...] 

    Description (by the authors) of the goal of the StressTyp project:

    The goal of StressTyp is to offer a quick entry to the primary and secondary literature on stress systems of the languages of the world. By primary literature we mean grammars and articles that provide descriptions of stress patterns, examples and the like. By secondary sources we refer to theoretical works on stress.  

1993

  • "A non-combined (or prototypical) converb may be defined (a) positively - as a verb form semantically related to another verb form, and (b) negatively - as a verb form which does not occur in the position (1) of the predicate of a simple non-elliptical sentence, (2) of the attribute to a noun, (3) of the complement in complement (object) clauses, (4) of the subject. In the above mentioned four positions the following verb forms occur: (1) a finite form, (2) a participle, (3) an infinitive, (4) a gerund.

1992

  • "Where the language is spoken, its classification, a description of the corpus of data the description is based on and how much of it, when it was collected, who the principal language helpers were, etc., references to anything else written on the language, highlight the linguistically interesting features of the language." (Roberts, 1992: 1)

1991

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