Lexical Lexical

    2004

    2003

    2000

    1998

    • "In the nature of our design, and our discussion, we rely heavily on Talmy's (1985) notion of lexicalization patterns, in particular his cross-linguistic discussion of systems of motion description. We are interested, for instance, in patterns of semantic conflation (that is, what other semantic information besides 'motion' may be encoded in a verb root) and patterns of semantic distribution (that is, what types of information are encoded in the different morphemes that come together to build a description of a motion event)." (Wilkins et al., 1998: 1).

    1996

    • ''The authors have made available a database containing the results of their use of the questionnaire. There are several versions of the database available. [...] 

      Description (by the authors) of the goal of the StressTyp project:

      The goal of StressTyp is to offer a quick entry to the primary and secondary literature on stress systems of the languages of the world. By primary literature we mean grammars and articles that provide descriptions of stress patterns, examples and the like. By secondary sources we refer to theoretical works on stress.  

    1992

    • "Where the language is spoken, its classification, a description of the corpus of data the description is based on and how much of it, when it was collected, who the principal language helpers were, etc., references to anything else written on the language, highlight the linguistically interesting features of the language." (Roberts, 1992: 1)

    1989

    • "STEDT is a long-term linguistics research project at the University of California at Berkeley. It is directed by Professor James A. MATISOFF of Berkeley's Linguistics Department. Our goal is the publication of an etymological dictionary of Proto-Sino-Tibetan (PST), the ancestor language of the large Sino-Tibetan language family. This family includes Chinese, Tibetan, Burmese, and over 200 other languages spoken in South and Southeast Asia." (from the STEDT website)

    1979

    • "The wordlist is published by the Australian Institute of Aboriginal Studies as a separate book. In its separate book form English entries constitutes a column on the left-hand side with a blank column to the right of them, with spaces left for the insertion of enties in Aboriginal languages - either different languages/dialects or individual speakers of the same language. [...]  

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